How To Use Your Cash Back Credit Card To Build A Rainy Day Fund

Cashback credit cards? Awesome. I’m personally so thankful that cash back cards are a thing because I utilize them to the full advantage. Or so I thought. Personally I have a Chase Freedom Unlimited card which gives me 1.5% back on everything I buy. Considering the fact that I graduated college recently and moved to a new city for my post grad life I got a lot of cash back during this move.

I try to use my credit card for every single purchase that I make because of the cash back feature. I know a lot of you will say this is irresponsible so let me quickly say I only expense things I can afford and will pay off every month. I don’t carry a balance and therefore I pay no interest on my card. So really, this cash back is just found money for me. When I was moving it was great because as I bought things that I would need in my new apartment my card gave me cash back to buy even more things I wanted but I didn’t consider essential to the apartment such as art or little knickknacks to make the apartment feel more like a home. Sadly, the plant I bought died but that’s neither here nor there. (I was devastated).

So getting back to cash back. If you are a responsible spender with your credit cards and not a frequent traveler I highly suggest going with the cashback option, but again you need to find a credit card that fits your lifestyle and personal spending habits. I know a lot of people around my age in cities like NYC or Boston that if they had excellent credit opted to go for the Uber credit card because of how it directly caters to those people who are very active in their social life. I also suggest checking out the Capital One Savor Card because of it’s great cash back on dining and entertainment.

I’ve talked to a lot of people about what credit card they use and why they chose that particular one. Most people take cash back and apply it to their statement balance so they owe less on their credit cards each month and I highly recommend doing this if you are carrying a balance from month to month. It will allow you to pay down your debt faster and get out of interest payments, if you have those.

Now that I carry a zero balance from month to month I don’t feel the need to apply my points right back into my credit card. Sure, I could go online and get some gift cards or apply them to travel but let’s be honest, I’m 22 and I don’t have time to go on crazy vacations and I try to curb my spending habits so that I can save more.

So I thought about this a lot. I wondered how I can best use my cashback. 1.5% sounds like nothing but it definitely adds up over the course of a year. As I was going through my options for my last point redemption it had an option if I would like to deposit the cash back into my checking account. Now I don’t keep my savings account with chase as you all know if you read my article on savings account, I use Marcus by Goldman. Some more digging allowed me to find that I can link any bank account up to my card and deposit the money there. Aha! A rainy day fund was created.

Sure I have my savings that I deposit a fixed amount in every month because I worked it into my budget, but I’ve never even thought about putting my cash back into a savings account. Even better, it’s an interest bearing savings account so basically I’m being handed money, putting it into an interest bearing account, and earning even more money on top of that. Think of it as a monthly allowance almost.

This is how I personally use my cash back but the more I thought about it the more I saw the wide range of possibilities this really has. Savings accounts offer low interest rates right now with the highest you’ll find hovering around 1.8% while the average market return year over year is 7%. So if you already have a rainy day fund and don’t feel the need to contribute more consider taking this cash back and putting it into an investment account, retirement or otherwise and letting it grow even more than a rainy day account ever would.

Make sure to subscribe to The Modern Piggy Bank using your email address and follow us on twitter @themodernpiggy2. As always you can email us directly at founders@themodernpiggybank.com with any comments or concerns you guys have. Have a topic you want to learn about? Shoot us an email and we’ll do the research.

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Buy A House Not A Home

If you are like me, home ownership is probably a long ways away.  However, I recently read a white paper called “The Rate of Return on Everything, 1870-2015” published by the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco.  Theres a lot of good facts and data in there and I strongly encourage you to read it (or skim it like a certain Modern Piggy Bank Founder did… looking at you Will).  But if reading 123 pages of economic data and commentary isn’t your cup of tea I’ll spare you the burden and tell you what I found most interesting.

The paper looks at major asset classes over the time period 1870-2015 most notably bills, bonds, equities, and housing and analyzes their return statistics.  Believe it or not housing was on par with equities with average return of 7% a year.  In the post World War II era, equities have taken a marginal lead, but the investor has also needed to take on more volatility and is subject to the ups and downs of the business cycle.  Where as the housing market has been much steadier over time.  Additionally, housing does not correlate heavily to the global markets i.e. a bear market is less likely to have a significant adverse affect on housing prices.

Now home ownership has been seen as a rite of passage in America and a sign that someone is financially well off.  Unfortunately, situations like the 2008 financial crisis show how a house can sometimes not be a wise investment especially your primary residence.  I’m currently looking to apply for my first credit card which I will talk about in a later post, but I find it concerning how the Federal Government insured home loans leading up to 2008 and will loan teenagers with no grasp of the concept of credit hundreds of thousands of dollars to achieve higher education because it’s a “good investment” while private credit institutions want new credit card owners to have $200 spending limits.  Anyways, I digress.

Back on track.  You will always need a dwelling, it will always be an expense.  I will even go on to make a controversial claim that a mortgage on your primary residence is nothing more than an expense.  If you weren’t paying it down every month you would be living in an apartment paying rent.  When you go to upgrade homes you will now have a higher monthly expense with the total offset by the profits on your past home sale.  Furthermore, theres property taxes, utilities, home improvement/maintenance, etc.  Your primary residence will probably not produce a dollar of cash flow.

Enter the rental home market.  Instead of adding to your expense column you can invest your money into a home for tenants.  Sites like airbnb have made this incredibly easy for vacation spots.  Some people even rent guest rooms in their own homes to offset their housing costs.  For me, it makes sense to invest in an asset that tends to increase in value over time, although this is not always the case, while I can put it to work and pay off its expenses and maybe even a little extra.  To take it a step further the white paper previously mentioned suggests that the lower volatility will protect my downside in case things go wrong as opposed to the equity markets which are heavily correlated across the globe.

If you can fit it into your budget and are willing to do the due diligence consider investing in a rental property.  I mean not to discourage you from home ownership because it is something incredibly rewarding that I look forward to one day.  I mean to challenge your thinking so you can minimize your expenses and optimize your savings.

Whether you like what I said or hated it feel free to reach out at founders@themodernpiggybank.com and follow us on twitter @themodernpiggy2.

Rich Dad Poor Dad

Hotly Debated. Ultimate Rating: 5/10

Our Rating: 5/10

This relatively short read on the importance of personal finance and investing has us in a huge debate here at The Modern Piggy Bank. One of us loves it and thinks it is a great start to learning personal finance and investing while another one personally hates it and think there is no practical advice. Regardless, here is our unbiased review.

The book reads as a series of short stories littered with financial advice. It follows the authors life from childhood to adulthood and sheds some light on how he was able to build his fortune through the years. Kiyosaki will routinely talk about how he consolidated expenses while seeking investment opportunities and follow it with practical knowledge of finance and accounting that can be applied to daily life.

This book can be an amazing starting point as to how to get in the mindset of wealthy money minded individuals. The ability to look at someone’s experiences and learn how they came up with an original investment idea while minimizing personal expenses can really cause one to re-evaluate what they are doing with their own finances. Kiyosaki was born into a middle class family that was us savvy with their finances, but his mentor was a prominent businessman, so the book allows you to see what separates a money minded person from the average.

What the book lacks is sound financial advice, especially when it comes to investments. Kiyosaki built his wealth during much of the 80’s and 90’s when the regulatory landscape was a bit more lax than it is today. The book itself was published in 2001. He will talk freely about securing loans with ease and purchasing low risk financial instruments with dubiously high returns. At The Modern Piggy Bank, we both agree we would not invest in most of the strategies he talks about in the book if they were even still possible.

Overall, the book has sold more than 32 million copies, has been a New York Times bestseller, and has been endorsed by many celebrities and news outlets. On the flip side, critics will say it provides no sound financial advice and reads as a cookie cutter self help book.

We personally believe there is no such thing as a bad book. You can purchase the paperback for less than $10 on Amazon or get the book for free if you google “Rich Dad Poor Dad PDF”. Pick up a copy and let us know what you think.